Spiced Possum in the Kitchen

The spicebush berries have just started to get ripe, and Holly Bellebuono’s book entitled The Healing Kitchen just came out ( http://www.hollybellebuono.com ). Holly contacted herbalists all over the country asking for their favorite recipes for nourishing, healing dishes using herbs and wild foods. She has compiled quite a collection–everything from garnishes, spice mixes, and beverages, to entire meals. I told her that one of my favorite wild herbs for cooking is spicebush. Spicebush is called “Lindera benzoin” by botanists, “spicewood” by many traditional southern Appalachian mountain folks, and “American allspice” by other plant lovers. It is found from New England and the northern Midwest, south as far as eastern Texas.

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spicebush1I collect the berries when they turn red, dry them, grind them up, and use them in the same way I would allspice flavoring for applesauce, stir-fries, and curries, as well as in teas, chais, nogs, and other beverages. In her book, Holly also mentioned that I use the twigs for tea, and as a flavoring for wild game. She didn’t have space to include the back story of how I was first introduced to the use of spicebush twigs in traditional Appalachian cookery. The story begins like this:

“Doug, I got you a ‘possum.”

Even on the phone, I could immediately recognize Lee’s familiar mountain drawl.

“You want ‘im? He’s a fat ‘un.”

Lee lived a few miles down the road in a little mountain community named Bee Log, North Carolina. He and his wife had befriended me when I was living in the area. Lee would call me whenever he had a ‘possum. He kept chickens and it seemed like he regularly had a ‘possum raiding his chicken coop. He would either catch it live in a box trap, or he’d shoot it when his dog treed it in the yard. Being a certified possumologist, when someone calls me about a ‘possum, I feel duty-bound to answer the call.

I never knew what condition the ‘possum would be in when I arrived–whether it would be alive, “grinning” and snarling at me from the box trap, or lying there dead. If it was alive, we would stuff it into a sack or a crate.

I’d say, “Thanks, Lee, that ‘possum‘ll be good eating.” And then I’d take it out into the national forest and let the poor thing go. If he had already killed the ‘possum, I would take it home and cook it.

Lee considered himself too affluent to eat ‘possum. Almost every visit he would show me his shelves of canned goods and his two freezers crammed full of deer, beef, chicken, pork, and bear meat. Even though he wasn’t planning to eat the ‘possum, he always had a lot to say about the subtleties of ‘possum cuisine. He wanted to be sure I prepared it properly.

I can remember him holding a particularly robust (but dead) ‘possum by the tail, practically salivating as he pinched the hind legs saying, “Now look at the fat hams on this critter, Doug. Now if you want to cook ‘im right, git you a mess of spicewood twigs. Cut ‘em with your knife so they’re sharp, and then when you get that ‘possum all skinned and cleaned, stick them little twigs in the meat and fill him up till he looks like a little porcupine. Then you par-boil him till he’s tender. See, them twigs’ll cut the gamey taste and give the meat a good spicy flavor. Then bake him in the oven with some sweet taters all around, and buddy, you gonna have some fine eatin’ “

I did just as he advised, and he was right; that spicewood flavored ‘possum meat was indeed, mighty fine eating. Since that time I always try to use spicewood whenever I cook wild game. Now you’ve got the whole story. Next time you’re cooking a ‘possum you’ll know what to do. Maybe spiced ‘possum will be in Holly’s next healing recipe book!

 

The Summer Sale is still going on!

Feel free to check out the products page of my website
for the Summer Sale.
http://www.dougelliott.com/products.html

As a special bonus, I’ll include a free copy of my Crawdads, Doodlebugs and Creasy Greens book with every order.

cover-crawdads-bookCrawdads, Doodlebugs and Creasy Greens
Songs, Stories, and Lore Celebrating the Natural World

Discover how to catch crawdads, puree pawpaws, gobble greenbriers, noodle catfish, tickle trout, cook squirrel brains, twist a critter out of its hole, and predict the weather with a persimmon seed. Learn how to greet a doodlebug and which rabbit’s foot is actually the lucky one. Hear tales about Queen Elizabeth when she was courted by a frog, Copper John Higgins when he swallowed a lizard, and Davy Crockett when he tried to grin a squirrel out of a tree.

The 64-page book features two dozen songs with musical notations, more than 90 original illustrations and a plethora of stories and lore.

cover-boundBound for Carolina CD
A Musical Journey Celebrating the Plants, Animals and People of the Southeast
An All Music Recording featuring the original tune, Big Black Snake

From Oh Susanna to Old Joe Clark, from the crawdad hole to the railroad yard, Elliott wails on his harp and sings a collection of blues, contemporary, traditional, and old-time songs celebrating country life, the natural world, and especially the people, the plants, the critters, and the rich environment and culture of southeastern North America. Elliott is accompanied by fiddles, guitars, banjos, mandolins, bass, drums, buckets, bottles, rattlesnake rattles, frog croaks and even a few blue yodels. This all-music recording features seven newly recorded songs as well as 14 favorites from previous albums. Special guests on this project include, Phil and Gay Johnson, Billy Jonas,Wayne Erbsen, and Todd Elliott.

Featured tunes:
Oh Susanna • Froggie Went a’ Courting • Big Black Snake • Rattlesnaking Papa • Old Joe Clark • Strawberry Picking • Dandelions • Creasy Greens • Root Blues • Crawdad Hole • Mole in the Ground • Bullfrogs on Your Mind • Bulldog on the Bank • Cluck O’ Hen • Who Broke the Lock • Ain’t No Bugs on Me • Sail On Honeybee • Bile them Cabbage • Left Hind Leg of a Rabbit • West Virginia • All Around the Water Tank

Normally $15 — NOW only $10 http://www.dougelliott.com/products.html

cover-eveningAn Evening with Doug Elliott DVD
Stories, Songs, and Lore Celebrating the Natural World

Elliott performs a lively concert of tales, tunes, traditional lore, wild stories, and fact stranger than fiction–flavored with regional dialects, harmonica riffs, and belly laughs. One moment he is singing about catfish, the next he’s extolling the virtues of dandelions, or bursting forth with crow calls. He also demonstrates basketry, ponders the “nature” in human nature, tells wild snake tales, and jams and jives with his fiddler son, Todd.

Normally $20 — NOW only $15 http://www.dougelliott.com/products.html

A Snaky Roll in the Hay

The chickens have been laying eggs among the hay bales in our shed. When we went to check for eggs one morning, we found a medium-sized black rat snake in the process of swallowing a large egg. Sometimes when this happens we indignantly take the egg away from the snake and carry the snake out to the garden and put it down a vole hole in hopes that it would devour some of those pestiferous rodents instead of our eggs. But this snake was not that large and her neck was stretched to the limit. She was working very hard to move the egg down her throat. I wanted to honor her efforts, so I didn’t disturb her. However, I didn’t want her to stay around the chicken nest and eat more eggs, so I decided to wait till she was finished swallowing the egg, and then take her to the garden.

While I was hanging out waiting for the snake to finish this laborious process, I was astounded to see another larger black rat snake slither into the scene! With no hesitation he crawled right on top of the first snake aligning his body with her every curve (including the grade A-sized lump in her throat). His belly started pulsing and caressing her with waves of undulations. Before long their cloacae pressed together and he inserted his slimy hemipenes. (Yep, like the opossum, he has a double ender.) It seemed that time stood still as they writhed lovingly together there in the hay. (All the while she was still trying to swallow her egg.)

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Finally he accomplished what he had come to do, and with a few fond flickers of his tongue, he slithered off. (We caught him and took him out to the garden.) With him gone she could now focus on her egg. She finally maneuvered the egg down her throat about six inches. She curved her body with the lump of the egg in a sharp angle, and we heard the satisfying crunch of the egg crushing. (Check out the video.) In a few minutes, with the egg collapsed, you couldn’t even tell the snake had just eaten the egg. She had had quite a morning. I wonder which of her endeavors gave her more satisfaction. I’ve always heard that females are good at multi-tasking. Now I believe it!

Here’s a few second video of her cracking the egg.

And here’s an original tune from the Bound for Carolina album celebrating a big black snake:

Hi friends, I hope you enjoyed this snaky roll in the hay! I wish you good luck with your own multi-tasking (and your rolling in the hay)!


Feel free to check out the products page of my website for the Summer Sale.

http://www.dougelliott.com/products.html

cover-eveningAn Evening with Doug Elliott DVD
Stories, Songs, and Lore Celebrating the Natural World
Elliott performs a lively concert of tales, tunes, traditional lore, wild stories, and fact stranger than fiction–flavored with regional dialects, harmonica riffs, and belly laughs. One moment he is singing about catfish, the next he’s extolling the virtues of dandelions, or bursting forth with crow calls. He also demonstrates basketry, ponders the “nature” in human nature, tells wild snake tales, and jams and jives with his fiddler son, Todd.
Normally $20 — NOW only $15
http://www.dougelliott.com/products.html

cover-boundBound for Carolina CD
A Musical Journey Celebrating the Plants, Animals and People of the Southeast
An All Music Recording featuring the original tune, Big Black Snake
From Oh Susanna to Old Joe Clark, from the crawdad hole to the railroad yard, Elliott wails on his harp and sings a collection of blues, contemporary, traditional, and old-time songs celebrating country life, the natural world, and especially the people, the plants, the critters, and the rich environment and culture of southeastern North America. Elliott is accompanied by fiddles, guitars, banjos, mandolins, bass, drums, buckets, bottles, rattlesnake rattles, frog croaks and even a few blue yodels. This all-music recording features seven newly recorded songs as well as 14 favorites from previous albums. Special guests on this project include, Phil and Gay Johnson, Billy Jonas,Wayne Erbsen, and Todd Elliott.
Featured tunes:
Oh Susanna • Froggie Went a’ Courting • Big Black Snake • Rattlesnaking Papa • Old Joe Clark • Strawberry Picking • Dandelions • Creasy Greens • Root Blues • Crawdad Hole • Mole in the Ground • Bullfrogs on Your Mind • Bulldog on the Bank • Cluck O’ Hen • Who Broke the Lock • Ain’t No Bugs on Me • Sail On Honeybee • Bile them Cabbage • Left Hind Leg of a Rabbit • West Virginia • All Around the Water Tank
Normally $15 — NOW only $10
http://www.dougelliott.com/products.html

Free Bees

Everybody appreciates a freebie! But what about free bees?! Nowadays beekeeping can be pretty expensive. A hive setup can run you upwards of a couple hundred dollars. Just the bees themselves often cost more than $100!  But lemmie tell you, in spring and summer there are whole swarms of bees out there flying around looking for a home. If you set up the right sized box in the right place, you may find it brimming over with bees one day.

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That’s what I did last year. The experts tell us that the box most likely to attract a bees swarm is basically any dry wooden box with a volume of about 10 gallons with a two-square-inch entrance towards the bottom of one wall.

They call this a “bait hive” or “swarm trap”. If it has some old honeycomb in it and the smell of propolis (resinous bee glue) all the better. Well, I had an empty hive body with lots of the resinous propolis on the walls. I put a couple frames of old comb in it and a dab of swarm lure pheromone that I bought from the bee supply store.

They say the optimal height for this contraption is 12-15 feet. And its best to locate it in a fairly open area not close to other hives since swarms are looking to settle in new territory.

I didn’t really want to climb onto a roof with this hive so I set it on our wood pile at about 6 feet. A couple weeks later I noticed a few bees investigating the entrance of the hive–,the next day a few more bees, and the next, an entire swarm came pouring in! I moved them to my bee yard. They built up during the summer and now, almost a year later, they are doing well.

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For more details about swarm catching check out Dr. Leo Sharashkin’s website: http://www.horizontalhive.com/honeybee-swarm-trap/bait-hive-how-to-catch.shtml

Speaking of bees if you’d like to take advantage of the
BUZZOLOGY SPECIAL SALE!
Go to my Products Page here
(Sale ends June 21 Solstice)

Swarm Tree, Of Honeybees, Honeymoons, and the Tree of Life (book) $15 ($3 off)
Sail On, Honeybee, Adventures in the Bee Yard (CD) $10 ($5 off)

FREEBEE LINKS :

Honeybee Fly Around Song Todd at age 13 singing about honeybees and dancing around (and on) the bee hives.

Poplar Appeal – UNC-TV Celebrating the tulip poplar tree as a source of honey, baskets, and many other things.

Well-Hung Catkins And Sticky Stigmas: The Promise of Spring

Catkins3035-ToddElliott

If you’re looking for the earliest flowers of spring it’s time to look up at the trees and shrubs. This is the time year when the dangling male catkins swell and the tiny, female flowers expose their sticky stigmas hoping to catch a few grains of windblown pollen.

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Alder catkins and pistillate flowers

Hazelnut catkin and pistillate flower

Hazelnut catkin and pistillate flower

Many plants, like apple trees, daisies, and roses, have what are called perfect flowers, meaning that they have male and female parts in the same flower. (The male parts are stamens, each made up of the filament or stalk topped by the anther which contains the pollen. The female part is the pistil, composed of the ovary at the base, and the stalk-like style, topped by the stigma, which is the part that receives the pollen.) Other plants like persimmons and holly trees have male and female flowers on separate trees, and some plants like the birches, alders, hazelnuts, and ironwoods have separate male and female flowers on the same plant. Late winter and early spring is the time to look for the swelling catkins and then challenge yourself to find those diminutive, delicate, pistillate flowers flaunting their finery.

Catkins0395-ToddElliott

The female flowers of the hazelnuts are a brilliant red!

The female flowers of the hazelnuts are a brilliant red!

The female flowers of the hazelnuts are a brilliant red!

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The pollen-bearing catkins can be an important source of protein for the growing honeybee larvae as colonies expand in Spring.

Here you can see a video of an ironwood tree in full flower. When it was abruptly shaken, you can see the huge cloud of pollen coming off the tree, (complete with human and avian exclamations!) I bet there were some satisfied stigmas that day! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nRkT-kGlvyU

Thanks to Todd Elliott for the photos. You can keep up with Todd’s photo work by following him on Twitter: https://twitter.com/toddfelliott1
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/toddfelliott/ or on his website: http://toddelliott.weebly.com/

Feel free to check out the products page of my website to take advantage of the
GETTING READY FOR SPRING HALF PRICE DVD SALE

An Evening with Doug Elliott  DVD
Stories, Songs, and Lore Celebrating the Natural World

Elliott performs a lively concert of tales, tunes, traditional lore, wild stories, and fact stranger than fiction–flavored with regional dialects, harmonica riffs, and belly laughs. One moment he is singing about catfish, the next he’s extolling the virtues of dandelions, or bursting forth with crow calls. He also demonstrates basketry, ponders the “nature” in human nature, tells wild snake tales, and jams and jives with his fiddler son, Todd.

Normally $20 — NOW only $10   http://www.dougelliott.com/products.html

If you’re in the Western NC area March 19:

VERNAL KERNELS
Celebrating the Season with Doug Elliott

Kernels of truth, and kernels of wisdom, woodslore, and foolishness. Blossoming blackberries, sexy slithering salamanders, jumping, humping frogs, courting cardinals, and whistling whippoorwills.

The days are getting longer and juices are flowing! Celebrate the season and the bioregion with master naturalist and storyteller Doug Elliott, who will be sharing a special collection of wild tales, lively tunes, traditional lore, and natural history fact stranger than fiction–all flavored with regional dialects, soulful harmonica riffs, and more than a few belly laughs.

Spring Equinox, Saturday, March 19 at 7PM
Bring snacks and drinks to share starting at 6:15pm
@ Earthaven Ecovillage, Black Mountain, North Carolina

Bring your wallets along with your smiles.
* Donations welcome for storytelling. Suggested amt: $10+
* Food and drinks available for purchase.
* CDs, Books, Baskets and more available from Doug.

For other Elliott appearances around the country
check out http://www.dougelliott.com/calendar.html

What About the Groundhog?

February 2nd is not far off.! So, what about the groundhog?

It turns out that February 2nd is a big day. It’s a cross-quarter day marking the halfway point between the winter solstice and the spring equinox. This is an ancient pagan celebration time known as the Festival of the Return of the Light. It’s a celebration of rebirth and renewal. In Gaelic Ireland it was known as Imbolc, the festival marking the beginning of spring. But what about the groundhog?

groundhog-reclineIn the northern temperate regions all around the world, folks noticed that the beginning of February is often the coldest time of the year. But even though it’s cold, the days are getting longer, the light is coming back. And with the light will come the warmth, and with the warmth will come the growth, and the world will be born anew. The seeds aren’t quite germinating, but the fire of life–that essential spark–is there. The light will return. But what about the groundhog?

February 2nd is also 40 days after Christmas. We all know the Virgin Mary was a nice Jewish girl. She was a devout follower of the laws of Moses, and according to ancient Jewish tradition, a new mother, after childbirth, spends 40 days in rest and recovery. Then after 40 days she takes her child to the temple and makes an offering, acknowledging that this is a child of God. With this offering, the child is redeemed from God into the care of the mother. So, this is what Mary did 40 days after Jesus was born. Now among many Christians February 2nd is a holy day, known as the Day of the Presentation of the Lord at the Temple. Since Christians see Jesus as the light of the world this implies a direct connection to the old Festival of the Return of the Light. But what about the groundhog?

In the old days people saved the drippings from the candles burned during that long winter darkness because tallow and wax were very precious. On February 2 they would remelt the wax and make the candles anew, celebrating the light coming back to the world. In many churches to this day, this holiday is still known as Candlemas. Hallelujah! The light is returning to our world! But what about the groundhog?

Early February is the time to check your supplies–take inventory. Check your stored food; how are your canned goods holding out? Check your woodpile; do you still have half of your firewood? Check the hay in the barn. February 2nd is considered the halfway point of the cold weather and if you’ve still got half your food and supplies left in the beginning of February, you should have enough to last til spring.

February 2nd, Candlemas day,
Half the grain and half the hay,
Half the winter is passed away,
We’ll eat our supper by the light of day.

Okay, the light is returning! That explains a lot, but what about the groundhog?

I’ve heard it all my life, you’ve probably heard it too: Mr. Groundhog comes out of his den on February 2nd and if it’s a cold, blustery, overcast, sleeting or rainy day, Mr. Groundhog stays out and spring arrives, right?

If it’s a beautiful, sunny day, Mr. Groundhog comes out of the ground, sees his shadow, gets scared, dives back into the ground, and we get six more weeks of winter! I’ve heard that all my life and it never made any sense to me–until I started researching groundhogology.

Groundhog Day is a throwback to ancient bear and badger cults from Europe. These folks didn’t so much worship these critters as much as they watched them.

groundhog-uprightThey watched these hibernating animals go into the ground in the fall and they didn’t come out. It was as if they died. The next spring however, when the world was being born anew they would miraculously rise up out of the earth as if they, too, had been reborn. The ancient ones realized that the life cycle of these hibernating animals is a great metaphor for the human spiritual journey. As we walk through this world our shadow is always with us. We all have a shadow that’s with us for all the days that we walk this earth. When we die and they put us in the ground, and when that hibernating animal goes into the ground in the fall, the shadow disappears. That shadow, the symbol of the soul, is set free and the animal sleeps the sleep of death. It becomes a part of the underworld–one with the earth. Early in spring as the time of rebirth and renewal approaches, the animal emerges from the underworld and if some of that old shadow–the old soul–is still attached, the process isn’t complete so the animal must return and continue sleeping that sleep of death until it is ready to be reborn completely anew.

That’s why we say if Mr. Groundhog sees his shadow we are going to get six more weeks of winter.

We’ll dig down and we’ll dig deep,
We’ll find that whistlepig where he sleeps
Oh Groundhog!


Hi Friends, I hope you enjoyed that taste of groundhogabilia and that you’re getting ready for the big cross-quarter day. We’re celebrating by offering a couple books and a CD at a discount. They each have something about groundhogs and lots of other interesting lore.

Feel free to check out the products page of my website to take advantage of the good deals. http://www.dougelliott.com/products.html

GROUNDHOG-OLOGY SALE (till Feb. 2)

cover-groundhogologyAward winning CD:
GROUNDHOGOLOGY, of Whistlepigs and World Politics

It all starts in Elliott’s mountain-side cabin with a gift from an old groundhog hunter. From there we go on a rollicking and revealing journey into folklore, history, and mythology. You’ll hear how groundhogs have been a source of food, clothing, medicine and music . You’ll learn the mystical aspects of groundhogs — how they are woven into Native American and European mythology. You’ll get clues to the great riddle: How much wood would a woodchuck chuck…? You will learn how groundhogs can teach us about ourselves, our society, and world politics today! This telling is flavored with traditional songs, lively harmonica riffs, belly laughs, and wood-chuckles. 55 minutes (Storytelling World, Honor Award)
CD 1/3 off Normally $15 —NOW only $10

cover-crawdads-bookThe Book:
CRAWDADS, DOODLEBUGS AND CREASY GREENS 
Songs, Stories, and Lore Celebrating the Natural World

Discover how to catch crawdads, puree pawpaws, gobble greenbriers, noodle catfish, tickle trout, cook squirrel brains, twist a critter out of its hole and predict the weather with a persimmon seed. Learn how to sing Oh Groundhog. Hear about Queen Elizabeth when she was courted by a frog, Copper John Higgins when he swallowed a lizard, and Davy Crockett when he tried to grin a squirrel out of a tree. This 64-page book features two dozen songs, more than 90 original illustrations and a plethora of stories and lore.
20% off Normaly $5–NOW only $4

cover-wildwoodsThe Hardback Book:
WILDWOODS WISDOM

Encounters with the Natural World

With the engaging voice of a country storyteller, Elliott draws on his own adventures–hitchhiking across the country, capturing snakes, tracking animals, hunting ginseng and searching out the wisdom of country folk and native peoples. You’ll hang out with Native Americans, Appalachian mountain men and biologists. And you’ll hear stories of Pentecostal snake handlers, hoodoo root doctors, possum breeders, and even a New York stockbroker. Join “Ranger” Doug as he stalks old time apples, disciplines coons, stalks groundhogs, and befriends possums. Beautifully illustrated with over 100 drawings by the author, Wildwoods Wisdom is a journey of awakening, of being at home in a world we may not often see, but to which we are forever joined. 196 pgs
Normally $23–NOW only $20

http://www.dougelliott.com/products.html

Jerusie Digging Time!

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It’s Jerusalem artichoke digging time around here. If your ground is not yet frozen you might want to harvest some too. (Before the voles eat ‘em all!)

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Jerusalem artichoke is a sunflower, not from Jerusalem, and not an artichoke, but other than that it’s well named! The name Jerusalem artichoke, is supposedly a corruption of the Italian, Girasola articiocco; Girasola referring to the sunflower’s reputation of always turning to face the sun. Its scientific name, Helianthus tuberosus, means “tuberous sunflower.” (That really is a good name.) Those crisp, crunchy tubers are one of our favorite wild foods. In fact we let ’em run wild all around our place. (Be careful about where you plant them– they can take over your garden.)

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Originally Jerusies were native to the central portion of North America, but due to extensive cultivation by both Native Americans and settlers, they are now naturalized in most temperate areas of North America, and parts of Europe and Asia.

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During late summer or early autumn, this perennial sunflower can be found in full bloom at the edges of fields and roadsides, usually where there is fairly rich, light soil. The plant usually stands from six to more than ten feet tall on single slender stalks. The flower is about two or three inches across and looks more like a yellow daisy than the large, seed-packed head of the cultivated seed-sunflower. But the problem is that they are hard to recognize because at that time of year there are dozens of tall, yellow, daisy-like flowers blooming (that botanists call DYC’s –“damn yellow composites”). How do we recognize the true “Jerusies” from the rest of the DYC’s?

The Jerusalem artichoke’s leaves and stem are covered with stiff, almost prickly hairs. The botanical word for this is “scurfy.” It’s onomatopoetic; if you rub your fingers across the leaves and listen carefully you will hear, “scurf, scurf.” (Who would have thought you can use your ears to identify a plant!) The coarseness of the leaves and the prickly hairs on the stem are one of the best identification points short of taking a shovel to the roots.

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The other distinctive characteristic is that the leaves are opposite at the lower part of the stem, (meaning that wherever one leaf comes out of the stalk there is another leaf directly opposite). The leaves are alternate at the upper portion of the stem.

Since the tubers are not mature and ready to harvest until the plants die back, it’s particularly challenging, when you’re facing a tangle of dead, dry, leafless stalks, to know which ones are the coveted Jerusalem artichokes.

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To identify the Jerusalem artichoke stalks that have died back, examine them to look for the bristly stubble and the leaf scars that go from opposite to alternate. (In the photo below you can see the upper two stalks from the upper parts of the plant show alternate leaf scars, while the two stalks below from the lower portion of the plant show opposite leaf scars.

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We scrub the tubers soon after we gather them. We usually eat the tubers raw, either grated into a salad, or simply munched with a dip. Sometimes we use them as a major ingredient in kimchi. They have about the same food value as potatoes, but instead of containing starch they contain an allied substance called inulin, which makes this tuber a valuable food for diabetics and others who strive for a low carbohydrate diet. But the drawback is that they promote flatulence in some folks, (who call them “fartachokes”). Cooking is the best remedy for that problem. They can be boiled, baked, or roasted. They have a distinctive, somewhat sooty flavor, slightly reminiscent of a potato with a more watery texture.

Jerusies will keep for months in a plastic bag in the refrigerator. They also keep well when reburied in soil.

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40th ANNIVERSARY ROOTS SALE !

cover-wildrootsCan you believe it? My first book is about to celebrate its 40th year! And, amazingly enough, it’s still in print! It still has lots of info about edible, medicinal, and otherwise useful and interesting wild plants and their underground parts–and best of all–it has portraits of more than 50 of your favorite roots! (The Jerusalem artichoke root drawing at the top of this blog post is from the book.)

The book was originally titled, ROOTS, and it came out in 1976, the same year as Alex Haley’s book by the same title! (Nobody ever offered to make a movie out of my book!) However, in 1995, Healing Arts Press reissued the book and changed the title to WILD ROOTS, A Forager’s Guide to the Edible and Medicinal Roots, Tubers, Corms, and Rhizomes of North America. And it’still available today. It’s on sale I till January 1st. I’ll knock $2 of the retail price and let’em go for $15 until the first of the year. It’s an underground classic! Get ‘em while you can!

http://www.dougelliott.com/products.html


Feel free to check out the products page of my
website to take advantage of the rest of the

GETTIN’ READY FOR WINTER SALE (till Jan. 1)

CD Sale! (8 titles to choose from)
All single CDs: $12.50; Double CDs $15
http://www.dougelliott.com/products.html

DVD Sale!
An Evening with Doug Elliott
DVD

Stories, Songs, and Lore Celebrating the Natural World
Elliott performs a lively concert of tales, tunes, traditional lore, wild stories, and fact stranger than fiction–flavored with regional dialects, harmonica riffs, and belly laughs. One moment he is singing about catfish, the next he’s extolling the virtues of dandelions, or bursting forth with crow calls. He also demonstrates basketry, ponders the “nature” in human nature, tells wild snake tales, and jams and jives with his fiddler son, Todd.
Normally $20 — NOW only $15   http://www.dougelliott.com/products.html

Swarm Tree Book Sale!
Swarm Tree: Of Honeybees, Honeymoons, and the Tree of Life
Following tracks, messing with bees, chasing butterflies, stalking deer, tickling trout, and picking up pawpaws—and hitchhikers. This lively collection by celebrated storyteller Doug Elliott will delight readers with its blend of natural history and heartfelt, hilarious takes on life. Whether tracking skunks, philosophizing over dung beetles, negotiating with the police, or reading divine script on the back of a trout, Elliott brings a sense of wonder and humor to every story. His broad scientific and cultural knowledge of the Appalachians and beyond is a treasure. Join him on this down to earth spiritual journey as he probes creation, asks the deeper questions, and reveals fascinating details of the great narrative of life that connect us all. Dive deeply into the richness of the natural world; climb high into the tree of life, and return–with amazing tales, humorous insights, and surprising truths that explore and illuminate, and celebrate the confluence of nature, humanity and spirit.
Normally $18 — NOW only $15   http://www.dougelliott.com/products.html

The Scarab and the Sacred Sphere

OF DUNG BEETLES AND THE SOURCE OF LIFE

beetledrawing

What! Moving dog poop? Were my eyes fooling me? Yes it was moving–right there at the edge of the driveway. I was on my way to the mailbox, but never mind that. I sat down right there and watched. It was definitely moving. A piece of this all too familiar canine calling card” was rising up. Yep, levitating dog poop right before my very eyes! And underneath it a handsome shiny black beetle appeared. The beetle had just cut off a chunk of feces. It had fashioned it into a perfectly round, symmetrical sphere about an inch in diameter, and now it was underneath, heaving away. Its head was facing down and its long hind legs reached up and grasped the sphere (reminiscent of the way ice tongs grip a block of ice). The ball of dung was almost twice its size. The beetle heaved with the front legs (like an upside down weight lifter) and the ball began to roll. It rolled a half a turn and stopped, another heave and the ball rolled some more.

Inch by inch, across the miniature hills and dales it rolled its precious cargo, laboriously pushing it up each small incline. On the downward slopes, the beetle merely tried to hang on to keep its precious orb from rolling away.

One of our neighborhood dung beetles hard at work rolling a “sacred chamber of potential.

One of our neighborhood dung beetles hard at work rolling a “sacred chamber of potential.

 

Below is a short video done by Todd Elliott of dung beetles rocking and rolling:

 

A mere ball of poop, has been transformed by this beetle, into a sacred chamber of potential. Not only is it a nutrient bonanza, it is a brood ball. Once an egg is deposited and the ball buried in the earth, it becomes a repository of valuable genetic material–that creature’s unique contribution to diversity on the planet.

Dung beetles lay relatively few eggs. Most insects lay dozens, if not hundreds or even thousands of eggs, but dung beetles invest so much special care providing each of their eggs with food, shelter and protection that fewer eggs are needed to reproduce the species. In some species of dung beetle, the female may lay only one egg the entire season. For an insect to lay so few eggs is extraordinary.

After the dung ball is interred in the earth and incubates for a number of days, the egg hatches into a tiny grub-like larva. Safely underground, the larva feeds on the dung and eventually pupates. A few weeks later a newly formed young adult beetle will emerge from the pupa, dig its way up to the surface of the soil, and lift its hard elytra (the shell-like wing covers that fold over a beetle’s back), unfurl its membranous flight wings, and with a whirring buzz, it flies away. It sallies forth on a pilgrimage, a mission, a quest–a journey into realms where other beasts refuse to tread–the fresh dung heaps left by larger animals.

For dung beetles, waste makes haste. “Before the sun becomes too hot, they are there in their hundreds, large and small, of every sort, shape and size, hastening to carve themselves a slice of the common cake,” wrote the great 19th century entomologist, J. Henri Fabre, as he described the frenzied activity of dung beetles in a French cow pasture more than a hundred years ago where he observed as many as 200 beetles of 10 or 15 species working on a single cow pie.

As you read this, millions of dung beetles are working day and night. They are practically everywhere, from our neighborhood dooryards and lawns, to farms, woodlands, pastures, prairies, and deserts the world over, laboring with strength and determination cleaning up dung, making a better world for us all.

During Operation Desert Storm, in the early 1990’s, my friend Clint was in Saudi Arabia on maneuvers. They were camping on a barren desert plain with no latrines or restroom facilities. The troops were instructed that when they had to “answer nature’s call” to merely go off into the desert and dig a hole. Since there was no cover or privacy, Clint said that if at all possible, he would wait till after dark. Except the problem with the darkness, he said, was the beetles. On a calm night those ever vigilant beetles would scent the not so subtle odor wafting across the desert sand and with determined wings buzzing, dozens of these large beetles would come madly flying in to claim their share of his precious offering. Scarabs are clumsy fliers and it was unnerving, he said, when one of those large insects crash-landed onto your exposed flanks.

After hearing Clint’s “war story” I found myself perusing the pages of a scholarly volume published by Princeton University Press entitled Dung Beetle Ecology. It was here I learned that from the point of view of dung beetles (and the scientists who study them,) the pile Clint was depositing there in the Arabian night is regarded as an “island” of high quality resources known to dungbeetle-ologists as a “patchy, ephemeral microhabitat.” A patchy ephemeral microhabitat! That’s quite an epithet for a pile of poop. The text explained that they are described as patchy, because in nature, “dung pats are scattered in spatial occurrence” (An occasional pile here and there); they are “ephemeral” because a dung pile in nature normally does not last very long. And no matter how large the pile, when compared with the environment at large it is still a small or “micro” habitat.

As small, ephemeral, patchy, and downright disgusting as a pile of poop may seem to us, as a source of food and shelter, dung has lots to recommend it. Most mammals, especially herbivores, digest only a small portion of the food they eat and what is left is rich in proteins, minerals, bacteria, yeasts and other nutrients. It is already partially digested and, best of all, dung is easy. Dung never defends itself or fights back like a live prey animal would. It doesn’t have thorns, irritating saps or other chemical defenses like many plants have. Most critters have no interest in it. Feces is simply there for the taking.

And takers there are — insects of many kinds, including beetles of many sizes, shapes, and lifestyles. Not all dung beetles are rollers, (i.e. Those that form a dung ball and roll it away.) There are the tunnelers that bore down into the soil, making nesting chambers directly under the pat and dragging dung down with them and there are the dwellers, those that simply move into the dung where it lies, chow down heartily and lay their eggs there.

Back at my driveway here in North Carolina I learned about another kind of dung beetle. When I watched that beetle bury its ball, I marked the place with a twig, wondering about how the beetle might develop and when it might emerge. After a few days, however, my curiosity got the best of me. I returned to the spot and carefully unearthed the ball, rolled it out on the ground and broke it open. I wanted to see the egg. You can imagine my surprise however, when I found not an egg, but a tiny beetle tunneling through the ball. Was this the new baby beetle? No way. Young beetles do not look like adult beetles; they look like grubs or larvae. Any fully formed beetle, whether it’s the size of a pinhead or a golf ball is a full-grown adult. This was an entirely different species of dung beetle with a different lifestyle. This little rascal was a klepto-parasitic dung beetle who makes its living by moving in and stealing the dung that another beetle has collected.

Thousands of years before Christ, the ancient Egyptians watched dung beetles rolling their loads across the desert sands. They linked what they saw with their observations of the heavens. They believed a celestial dung beetle known as Kepeherer, the sacred scarab, was responsible for rolling the solar orb on its daily journey across the sky. Every evening in the West the great celestial sphere is buried, just like the scarab’s ball of dung, and just like the newborn scarab beetle that rises out of the sands, every morning on the eastern horizon the brilliant ball of the sun rises out of the earth and brings a new dawn to the day and new life to the world.

If something as lowly as the humble dung beetle, as well as something as glorious as the sun can be reborn after they were dead and buried, could it be that humans might also experience rebirth and life after death?

To investigate this eternal question, the ancient Egyptians observed the scarab. They watched the wormlike larva living and growing, neatly encapsulated within its own sphere of existence, squirming about, eating constantly and carving itself a cozy little niche inside its own personal ball of dung. “This is not unlike the human condition,” Egyptian theologians might have surmised. When the larva has eaten almost all of the ball and nothing but a thin wall separates it from the surrounding earthly outside world, it stops eating, and pupates. All external movement stops while the pupa drops into a deep transformative sleep. The early Egyptians contemplated the quiescent pupa lying in its underground chamber bound tightly in its pupal wrap. After a time, the pupal skin splits open and this once inert creature crawls forth, metamorphosing into a glistening adult who pushes up out of the earth.

Bearing jagged protrusions on its head, and serrations on the front legs that look like the rays of the rising sun, the gleaming new being unfurls its sparkling, diaphanous wings and soars triumphantly off into the heavens.

“Could this be a metaphor for us humans?” the Egyptian priests might have wondered. Whatever their conclusions, the fabulously wealthy and powerful Egyptian royalty were taking no chances. They devoted most of their lives and their fortunes as well as those of thousands of their slaves and subjects to building and preparing proper pupal chambers for their own metamorphoses. The royal crypts of the Egyptian rulers were provisioned with everything from golden bejeweled coffins, hieroglyphic prayer books, chariots, maps and hand-painted murals of the underworld. The body of the deceased ruler was preserved by an elaborate embalming process using herbs, spices, oils, resins, and gums. Often the heart was removed from the body and replaced with a stone carving of a scarab beetle. The body was wrapped in strips of linen to form a mummy, and the royal coffin was covered by an ornate sarcophagus.

Some claim that the Great Pyramids were an attempt by the pharaohs to conceal their remains and protect the accompanying treasures from grave robbers. I still can’t help but think about that little klepto-parasitic dung beetle quietly working away there in the soil beside my driveway, plundering the work of others in the same way the grave robbers plundered tombs in Egypt many centuries ago. Only a few Egyptian tombs survived undisturbed into the modern era, and now much of their wealth has been removed and is in the possession of the European museums. Are they institutional klepto-parasites?

Entomologist Yves Cambefort (one of the editors of Dung Beetle Ecology) speculates that the tightly bound Egyptian mummy is actually an attempt by the ancients to replicate the pupa of the sacred dung beetle. He suggests the Great Pyramids, in all their glory, just might represent stylized camel or cattle plops!

Amidst this lively flurry of cross-cultural interpretation, theory and speculation about the artifacts and belief systems of ancient Egyptians, we must not ignore or discount the deep intrinsic wisdom of a culture whose spirituality honors the burying of manure in the ground as a source of rebirth and new life.


I hope your enjoyed the cross-cultural dung-beetle-ology above . It’s an excerpt from my book, Swarm Tree, Of Honeybees, Honeymoons and the Tree of Life. Swarm Tree is on sale along with my recordings (see below). Feel free to check out the products page of my website to take advantage of the

GETTIN’ READY FOR WINTER SALE (till Jan. 1)

http://www.dougelliott.com/products.html

CD Sale! (8 titles to choose from)
All single CDs: $12.50; Double CDs $15

DVD Sale!
An Evening with Doug Elliott DVD
Stories, Songs, and Lore Celebrating the Natural World

Elliott performs a lively concert of tales, tunes, traditional lore, wild stories, and fact stranger than fiction–flavored with regional dialects, harmonica riffs, and belly laughs. One moment he is singing about catfish, the next he’s extolling the virtues of dandelions, or bursting forth with crow calls. He also demonstrates basketry, ponders the “nature” in human nature, tells wild snake tales, and jams and jives with his fiddler son, Todd.
Normally $20 — NOW only $15 http://www.dougelliott.com/products.html

Swarm Tree Book Sale!
Swarm Tree: Of Honeybees, Honeymoons, and the Tree of Life

Following tracks, messing with bees, chasing butterflies, stalking deer, tickling trout, and picking up pawpaws—and hitchhikers. This lively collection by celebrated storyteller Doug Elliott will delight readers with its blend of natural history and heartfelt, hilarious takes on life. Whether tracking skunks, philosophizing over dung beetles, negotiating with the police, or reading divine script on the back of a trout, Elliott brings a sense of wonder and humor to every story. His broad scientific and cultural knowledge of the Appalachians and beyond is a treasure. Join him on this down to earth spiritual journey as he probes creation, asks the deeper questions, and reveals fascinating details of the great narrative of life that connect us all. Dive deeply into the richness of the natural world; climb high into the tree of life, and return–with amazing tales, humorous insights, and surprising truths that explore and illuminate, and celebrate the confluence of nature, humanity and spirit.
Normally $18 — NOW only $15

http://www.dougelliott.com/products.html